About Coronavirus

About Coronavirus

Depression, Anxiety and Stress Associated With the Coronavirus COVID-19 Disease

The current coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is a particular and rare situation. It can affect people physically, but also psychologically. In this type of context, many people will experience stress, anxiety and depression reactions. This page should be seen as a tool that can help you to minimize the repercussions of these kinds of reactions on your life.

Centers for Desease and Control Prevention is responding to a pandemic of respiratory disease spreading from person-to-person caused by a novel (new) Coronavirus. The disease has been named “coronavirus disease 2019” (abbreviated “COVID-19”). This situation poses a serious public health risk. The federal government is working closely with state, local, tribal, and territorial partners, as well as public health partners, to respond to this situation. COVID-19 can cause mild to severe illness; most severe illness occurs in older adults.

Everyone experiences anxiety at their own individual degree and intensity. How the anticipated event is perceived will greatly influence the intensity of the anxiety experience. Contrary to fear, which is a response to a well-defined and very real threat, anxiety is a response to a vague or unknown threat. Anxiety manifests itself when we believe that a dangerous or unfortunate event may take place and are expecting it.

CDC Recommends


On March 16, the White House announced a program called “15 Days to Slow the Spread,”pdf iconexternal icon which is a nationwide effort to slow the spread of COVID-19 through the implementation of social distancing at all levels of society. Older people and people with severe chronic conditions should take special precautions because they are at higher risk of developing serious COVID-19 illness. Everyone can do their part to help us respond to this emerging public health threat:


If you are a healthcare provider, use your judgment to determine if a patient has signs and symptoms compatible with COVID-19 and whether the patient should be tested. Factors to consider in addition to clinical symptoms may include:
Does the patient have recent travel from an affected area?
Has the patient been in close contact with someone with COVID-19 or with patients with pneumonia of unknown cause?
Does the patient reside in an area where there has been community spread of COVID-19?


If you are a healthcare provider or a public health responder caring for a COVID-19 patient, please take care of yourself and follow recommended infection control procedures.

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